Red Dwyer ~ Live 3 pm EDT (GMT-5)

Red Dwyer ~ Live 3 pm EDT (GMT-5)

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This topic contains 34 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Red 4 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 35 total)
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  • #951

    Lizzie
    Participant

    I can honestly say – that’s true lol..a fire under the feet will get you far..  it’s fairly safe to say a person who has a desire to write a book must have some idea in their head of what they want to write – but it seems to be a hurdle in starting – it was for me, so if they have the ablility and drive but are not really sure what to write about, how do they figure it out?  How do you?  You write about all different things – so do you just go with whatever pops in your head and see how it develops – and have you had ideas that stalled at some point instead of going where you thought they might?  If so, what ever happens to the WIP that doesn’t make any progress?

    #952

    Red
    Keymaster

    Loads, Laurie.

    Most authors fall into the trap of only associating with other authors. Expanding your social media horizon to encompass your readers is the key to selling books. Other authors are great for reviews and giving away copies, but until you tap into your audience, your book is just sitting on your shelf.

    Before you get that far, though, you must know who your audience truly is.

    #953

    Red
    Keymaster

    Lizzie, let me see if I can get them all for you.

    1. The author who has no idea what to write needs to read more. The desire and skill are there, but without a source of inspiration, they are transcription tools. Reading sparks the imagination.

    Flash fiction is another great way to start a story. When a writer has really no idea what to write, even a one word prompt can get the process started.

    2. My ideas come nearly complete. I just fill in the details…or someone asks me to write a book about ____________.

    (continued on next post)

    #954

    Red
    Keymaster

    (Cont’d for Lizzie)

    3. Some ideas do languish. The inspiration was good to get started, but not enough to sustain the intensity of the pressure to complete. Some stories just fizzle out with no punchline. Those are the most disappointing for me. The characters’ hearts are not in the story. They deserve to rot in the WIP folder.

    4. Ultimately, I throw them away. Most writers despise rewriting because it is not as creative. This applies to me. I may keep the idea as a glimpse for later, but I do not spend an inordinate amount of time forcing it to work. Readers can tell when you are filling in the plot merely to have enough pages for a book. They deserve better.

    #955

    Lizzie
    Participant

    that makes sense, thank you 🙂  I have often wondered if a book – ficiton can be created on the fly  – I am not really asking this the right way I guess but I think many people think you have to know how its going to end before you begin – and I have come to realize through the things I have learned lately, that isn;t necessarily so.  Do you think its better or necessary rather. to know how it will end first as far as putting your time into a story – or just to go with the inspiration and see where it takes you?

    #956

    Red
    Keymaster

    I think you need to know where the milestones are going to be. For instance, if you are writing a romance novel, having your heroine die in chapter four is a story hole which is hard to overcome. However, if you are working with, say, a coming of age novel, it is easier to go with the flow until adulthood (or maturity, as we all know they do not go hand-in-hand).

    I do not think you need to know everything in advance to write it. It is more fun to discover some things along the way.

    #957

    Lizzie
    Participant

    What are your thoughts on someone writing a self help book  – or having the knowledge to write a non-fiction book with the intent of imparting advice to others, yet they are hung up in the fact they have no credentials?  It was kind of an issue for me, not so much with Month of Mental Moments but on something s I am working on and we have talked about it before but  I think it is a common stop.. feeling like without the degree or whatnot, we have no business speaking of it.

    I was going to ask you if it was more fun to know your story or do it on the fly.. but you answered it. 🙂

    #958

    Ian Shaw
    Participant

    Thanks Red – very interesting! 🙂

    Love and hugs!

    Ian(Prenin)

    #959

    Red
    Keymaster

    Degree or not is not truly an issue, Lizzie. If you establish your authority with correct information, a lack of formal instruction on any matter will be foregone by the audience.

    Flaunting of credentials is a crap shoot anyway. I am less likely to buy something written by a self-proclaimed, credentialed expert than I am a layperson who will cut to the chase, give me the truth of their experience and not be influenced by the portions of the professional community who would be alienated by such truth.

    Marketing is the answer to the question. Blogging is one way to establish outside authority, as well as producing subsequent books on the same or similar subject.

    #960

    Red
    Keymaster

    Glad you could make it, Ian. Do you have any questions you would like me to answer?

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